Charcoal Lane Featured Artworks

Please Note:

This biography and artwork meaning Intellectual Property including Indigenous Cultural Intellectual Property belongs to Dreamtime Art, the artists/their estates and is subject to copyright. To protect these copyrights, no reproduction of any or all parts is allowed unless there is prior written permission and approval by Dreamtime Art.


Indigenous Culture and Community
Indigenous people of Australia have spent thousands of years as the original custodians of this country, managing the landscape through knowledge passed down with thousands of generations. Passing knowledge through ceremony and initiation passages asserts a responsibility to all people in community; to play a vital role in ensuring the balance of life and culture are maintained. 

60,000 years of knowledge places Indigenous people as the oldest continuous living culture adapting to environmental extremities, surroundings and living conditions such as two glacial maximums (ice ages). Knowledge as custodial responsibility are vital for sustaining the relationship between, people, community, environment, Dreaming and ultimately life; therefore, increasing their chances of survival. 

Each member of the Indigenous community plays a part in sustaining the balance to the complex Indigenous society; conceptually, a part of an imaginary chain that interlinks each individual into a strong community network. A break in this link sees the loss of knowledge and an end of custodianship; a threat in the fragility of Indigenous life. The understanding of taking care of the land, rather than owning it transcends the principles of possession. Indigenous people take only what is needed to provide for its people. Agreements with neighbouring communities saw the harmony between shared boundaries and ceremonies around trade. 

Aboriginal Art Origins
Aboriginal Art has place in Indigenous communities reflecting an ancestry as old as time immemorial. Ceremony, knowledge, tradition, lore (law), customs and country are shared as connectedness through oral traditions, song, dance and art.

Painting through sand, caves and body encapsulates intergenerational knowledge imparted onto each custodian. For Indigenous communities this is literacy.

Seasons of change, navigation throughout landscapes, creation stories, initiations are transferred through family groups ensuring guardianship, authenticity and preservation which are intrinsic and offer completeness in managing country.

Aboriginal Art becomes the integral aspect of continuation of Aboriginal knowledge and intergenerational wisdom and can be described as old as yesterday, yet as contemporary as tomorrow.  



Artist Name: Beverley Cameron
D.O.B: Circa 1957
Birthplace: Anangu Pitjantjatjara Lands, South Australia
Language Group: Pitjantjatjara Community Fregon

Price: $2295.00

It is a tjukurpa story of two women from Manturu. The women travelled on to the waterhole at Alice Springs, Bungalow Waterhole, a very important women’s place. They live now in the waterhole. The Dreaming track of the Kungka Kutjara who travelled from Puka in the Mann Ranges to Katartitja north of Uluru, then to Parntu (Lake Amadeus) to Ulpunyali near Kings Canyon, and then to the waterhole at Alice Springs. This is a very significant Women’s Dreaming track linking Pitjantjatjara, Yankunytjatjara and Arrernte women’s country and law.

Beverley Camerson is from Fregon on the *APY Lands. An accomplished artist, Beverley works from the Kaltjiti Arts Centre in Fregon. Beverley has three children. *Anangu Pitjantjatjara/ Yankunytjatjara Lands, far north west of South Australia.




Artist Name: Maureen Ward Nakamarra
D.O.B: 1/11/1989
Birthplace: Kiwirrkurra, W.A.
Language Group: Pintupi

Price: $1495.00 each

Maureen is the daughter of Lorna Ward Napanangka. Maureen now resides in both Kiwirrkura and Alice Springs. Lorna, Maureen’s mother, is a well established Western Desert artist, known for her tenacious personality. Her eccentric gridded maps provided a stark contrast to the early brightly coloured, fluid works of other female painters. Lorna’s willingness to persevere laid the foundations for this new wave, with the Art Gallery of NSW acquiring a large-scale work from a solo exhibition.
Maureen is also the grandchild of the late Timmy Payungka Tjapangati, among the first of the Pintupi people to be relocated to the new settlement at Papunya. Timmy Payungka was a founding member of the Papunya Tula Art Centre.

Maureen has been painting for a few years and has been highly influenced by her strong traditional painting lineage. Maureen is depicting women’s ceremonial sites of Marrapinti and Lake Mackay south west of Kiwirrkura. The ceremony which takes place here involves sharpening a piece of animal bone and using it to pierce the septum of the nose. Other information on these women’s ceremonies is privy only to the initiated.



Artist Name:   Sally Butler Napurrula
D.O.B: Circa 1967
Birthplace: Papunya N.T.
Language Group: Pintupi / Luritja / Ngaatjatjarra

Price: $1495.00

Family History:  Sally is the daughter of acclaimed artist Anatjari Tjakamarra, who became part of the original group of painting men that formed around Geoffrey Bardon at Papunya in 1971. He was also one of the original Papunya Tula shareholders when the company formed at the end of 1972. Anatjari Tjakamarra was one of a family group who were some of the last people out of the desert. They began walking into Papunya in 1966.
Sally is also the daughter of Katarra Napaltjarri, Katarra was the second wife of Anatjari Tjakamarra, her older sister being his first wife, Nguya. Katarra was born in Tjukurla, Western Australia and she was transported to Papunya by truck in 1966. Katarra names Maki, Kim and Jason as her children, although it is believed that they were born to Nguya, her sister. Katarra has been painting alongside acclaimed artists such as Ningura Napurrula in Kintore since 2001.
Sally has been painting for a number of years in Kiwirrkurra and Alice Springs, her work going from strength to strength. Sally is now an in demand artist and has a talent for producing finely executed works which are constantly evolving in the designs she produces.
Country: Tjukurla, W.A. Kiwirrkurra, W.A.
Sally lives in Kiwirrkurra with her mother Katarra.

Dreamings: Sally’s dreaming’s have been passed down to her from both her Father and Mothers sides, she often paints bush tucker and water dreaming stories from her Mother’s country around Tjukurla in W.A. which is close to the South Australia border. She also paints designs associated with her father’s country which is around Lake MacKay which close to Kiwirrkurra approximately 350km North West of Tjukurla. 



Name: Cameron Ken
D.O.B:  Circa 1966
Birthsite / Region: Anangu Pitjantjatjara Land
Language / Tribal Group: Pitjanjatjara

Price: $2695.00

Chris has painted the desert country around Fregon on the* APY Lands.. Flat plains are dotted with wild flowers and spinifex grass, interspersed by small rocky outcrops framed by the majestic Musgrave ranges. This naive painting has captured the vibrancy and colour of the desert landscape inspired by traditional country and culture Chris is from Fregon on the *APY LAnds. He is married to Nancy George and they have two children Chris works as an artsworker at the Kaltjiti Arts Centre. As an artsworker, Chris is a valued staff member of Kaltjiti Arts. He is responsible for preparation of canvases for artists. *Anangu Pitjantjatjara/ Yankunytjatjara Lands, far north west of South Australia.



Name: Esther Bruno Nangala
D.O.B:  Circa 1981
Birthsite / Region: Papunya
Language / Tribal Group: Pintupi

Price: $1695.00

Esther Bruno Nangala was born around 1981 in Alice Springs but was brought up in Christmas Creek near Fitzroy Crossing and was also partly raised in Kintore. She is a Luritja/Pintupi woman but her schooling allowed her to be versed in both Pintupi and English. In 1999, the door to the art world opened up for her. This was the year that her grandmother, Naata Nungurrayi who is an iconic artist of the desert art movement (known for her depiction of “Women’s Law” and “Tingari Cycle”) took her as her apprentice.

With the advantage of speaking both languages, Esther became involved in important cultural initiatives such as translating Pintupi songs into English paving a pathway for both Indigenous and Western culture to intermingle through expression of music.

Her first paintings were collaborative and she only began to be truly recognized as an individual artist in 2009. Her Dreamings are stories around important Women’s sites and her work is a tapestry of intricate design and her use of bold colour is reminiscent of her grandmothers’ work. Her work is highly eye-catching, textured, colourful and represents the thrilling potential of desert art in the years ahead.



Name: Nellie Marks Nakamarra
D.O.B:  Circa 1976
Birthsite / Region: Kintore
Language / Tribal Group: Pintupi | Luritja

Price: $1295

Nellie was born around 1976 in Kintore, Central Australia and the place where she also began her painting. She belongs to the Pintupi (also spelt Pintubi). Her dreamings (mentioned above) were passed on by her family for thousands of years being handed down from one generation to the next. She is the custodian of her father and her grandfathers Dreamings which relates to the country east of Kintore in the Western Desert of the Northern Territory of Australia. Nellie is a respected member of her people and follows a traditional lifestyle. She takes part in women’s ceremonies and women’s paintings.

Her teachers were Old Mick Namarrari, Uta Uta, Pinta Pinta and her father, the great master Turkey Tolson Tjupurrula. Through their teachings, Nellie gradually developed her own style and went from her naturally shy, introverted personality to gaining the confidence to be associated with other famous artists. Nellie showed the art world her capabilities and artistry as a painter and has now gone on to be a successful and sought after artist along with her sister Elizabeth Marks Nakamarra.



Artist Name: Josephine Nangala
D.O.B: Circa 1950
Birthplace: Tjikulpa, west of Kiwirrkurra
Language Group: Pintupi

Price: $2295.00

Josephine was born out in the desert to the west of Kiwirrkurra in approximately 1950. Her parents had been at the Balgo mission for schooling in their early age but moved back out to the bush away from the community, though when Josephine was old enough for school they moved back to Balgo again.
Josephine married Charlie Wallabai Tjungurrayi with whom she had two sons and two daughters. The family then moved to the new community of Kiwirrkurra where Josephine began painting for Papunya Tula Artists in the late 1990’s to early 2000’s.
Josephine also participated in the opening ceremony of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games.

Josephine’s paintings relate to women’s Tingari stories including Ngarru, Minyma (women’s dreaming) and Tali Mangarri, (Sand Hills and Bush Damper) 



Name: Kudditji Kngwarreye
D.O.B:  Circa 1928
Birthsite / Region: Utopia
Language / Tribal Group: Anmatyerre

Price: $1295.00

Kudditji (pronounced Koo-bee-jee) Kngwarreye was born around 1928 and is the younger brother of the late Emily Kame Kngwarreye (one of the greatest and highly collectable artist). Kudditji was brought up in the bush, the traditional nomadic way. Once he was a grown man, he had a long career as a stockman and as a mine worker.

Kudditji is an Anmatyerre elder and the custodian of many important Dreamings. Initially as a young artist, his works were carefully planned and meticulously executed. His recent works have shown an evolution in his techniques and strategies with the application of acrylic paint on canvas along with the never-ending choice of colour.

His artistry that has seen him soar to International acclaim are more abstract, more use of bold colour and his trademark large brushstrokes creating patches of unregimented squares. His connection with the land (which he has walked by foot) is illustrated in each of his artworks and his intense use of colour has proved him to be a popular pick for collectors.


Kudditji (pronounced Koo-bee-jee) Kngwarreye was born around 1928 and is the younger brother of the late Emily Kame Kngwarreye (one of the greatest and highly collectable artist). Kudditji was brought up in the bush, the traditional nomadic way. Once he was a grown man, he had a long career as a stockman and as a mine worker.

Kudditji is an Anmatyerre elder and the custodian of many important Dreamings. Initially as a young artist, his works were carefully planned and meticulously executed. His recent works have shown an evolution in his techniques and strategies with the application of acrylic paint on canvas along with the never-ending choice of colour.

His artistry that has seen him soar to International acclaim are more abstract, more use of bold colour and his trademark large brushstrokes creating patches of unregimented squares. His connection with the land (which he has walked by foot) is illustrated in each of his artworks and his intense use of colour has proved him to be a popular pick for collectors.



Name: Unknown
D.O.B:  Unknown
Birthsite / Region: Unknown
Language / Tribal Group: Unknown

Price: Not for sale